First State Robotics… Join us

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First State Robotics is a Delaware 501(c)(3) nonprofit that fosters a love of science and technology by engaging students in the engineering design process and in robotics competitions while promoting the core value of gracious professionalism.

Gracious Professionalism is a way of doing things that encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and respects individuals and the community. Created in 2001, we inspire and motivate young people to extend learning beyond the classroom in order to-

• Develop and pursue interests in science, engineering, and technology
• Become confident, independent, and responsible
• Use creative thinking and problem-solving to make a difference in the world

Our robotics programs and affiliate partners impact students of all ages:

• Jr. FIRST® LEGO® League (Jr.FLL®) – grades k to 4
• FIRST® LEGO® League (FLL®) – grades 5 to 8
• FIRST® Tech Challenge (FTC®) – high school
• FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC®) – high school

Our annual local and statewide competition events are free and open to the public.

To view non-profit approval and documents of incorporation, click here.

FTC teams move ahead to Championship events

Congratulations to FSR’s two FTC teams! So far, both have done very well this season.

Our rookie team, Rhyme Know Reason, has earned two robotics awards over the past two weeks. On November 22, in Oxford, PA, they earned the Motivate Award. Last Saturday November 29, in Ambler, PA, they earned the Think Award for their excellent engineering notebook. With this award they earned the opportunity to compete at the PA State FTC Championship in late February. In addition, they will also be competing at the Diamond State Championship in Dover, DE, next January 31.

Their team, with lead mentor Dawn Dockter and several other mentors, has built a strong foundation of teamwork and engineering exploration.

Also at the Oxford event, our veteran FTC team, MOE 365, was Alliance captain for the winning alliance and they were awarded the Connect Award.

At the Ambler event,  MOE earned the Inspire Award, (top award) and was on the winning alliance of teams (with a team from Delaware’s Archmere Academy) in on-field competition. They have also earned a championship berth in Pennsylvania and in Delaware.

We wish them all the best as they move forward to FTC’s 2014 championship events.

FTC events are free and open to the public. For information about locations and times, click the links above.

You can read about the FTC game– Cascade Effect– and preview the video here.

Students talk robotics with Delaware STEM educators

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Student representatives of two FSR teams– FRC 365 (MOE) and FTC 8528 (Rhyme Know Reason)– demonstrated their robots and talked about their design process with attendees at the first annual STEM Educator Award presentation. Adult representatives of FSFLL and Diamond State FTC as well as FSR board members were also on hand to answer questions and hand out program information. The event, sponsored by the Governor’s STEM Council, was held November 17 at the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington.

To learn more about DE STEM Council, click here.

Local high schoolers and today’s robots

Photo by Adriana M. Groisman

Photo by Adriana M. Groisman

In a News Journal article November 19, Robots to the rescue, reporter Molly Murray wrote about current real-world applications using robots in education, science and exploration, as well as security and industry. Adult mentors and students of DuPont and FSR sponsored team, MOE365, working at their build site on DuPont’s Barley Mill campus, were one prominent focus of her story.

She also spoke with FSR board members, Karen O’Brien and board president, Peggy Vavalla, as well as two FSR partners– directors of Delaware’s FTC, FLL and JFLL programs– Eric Cheek and Teshenia Hughes about robots as an educational tool.

Working with Cheek at DSU, Hughes became involved in development of elementary and middle school LEGO League teams. “My passion changed. I believe in it,” she said.

To see the article and video interview with MOE students, visit News Journal’s site here.